08-12
17

What is RAID?

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AuthorEASEUS   Category Basic Computing Guide   Comments0   Post Time 2008-12-17 19:57:18 -0500

RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent (or Inexpensive) Disks. In 1987, Patterson, Gibson and Katz at the University of California Berkeley, published a paper entitled "A Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)". This paper described various types of disk arrays, referred to by the acronym RAID. The basic idea of RAID was to combine multiple small, inexpensive disk drives into an array of disk drives which yields performance exceeding that of a Single Large Expensive Drive (SLED). Additionally, this array of drives appears to the computer as a single logical storage unit or drive.


The Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) of the array will be equal to the MTBF of an individual drive, divided by the number of drives in the array. Because of this, the MTBF of an array of drives would be too low for many application requirements. However, disk arrays can be made fault-tolerant by redundantly storing information in various ways.


RAID involves the configuration of two or more drives in combination for fault tolerance and performance. RAID disk drives are used frequently on servers and are increasingly being found in home and office personal computers.


It is a method of creating one or more pools of data storage space from several hard drives. It can offer fault tolerance and higher throughput levels than a single hard drive or group of independent hard drives. You can build a RAID configuration with IDE (parallel ATA), SATA (Serial ATA) or SCSI hard disks.

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